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Health

Schedule Your Child’s Immunization Appointment Now

childhoodimmunizationsAs fathers, we’re dedicated to keeping our children safe and away from harm. Part of that responsibility is keeping them healthy and being aware of their vaccinations - an essential part of keeping them and the community they live in disease free.

Although most of the diseases that vaccinations protect against are now rare in the U.S., outbreaks still happen, the CDC says. Cases of pertussis, or whooping cough, for example, have been on the rise in the past few years.

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Alzheimer's and Stress: A New Study Reaffirms the Link

stress2014But not all stress is tied to the disease. It's the everyday kind that wears you down.

It has been known for years that stress contributes to heart disease, insomnia, digestive disorders and a host of other health problems. Now there's increasing evidence that it also may trigger Alzheimer’s Disease.

A study released in March by the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine appears to back up earlier hypotheses that link stress with Alzheimer's. But not all types of stress are to blame.

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Using Internet, Apps to Manage BP Has Dangers: Study

bloodpressureappstudyPeople who turn to the Internet or iPhone apps for help in controlling their blood pressure may be led astray in some cases, two preliminary studies suggest.

In one study, researchers who did a sweep of YouTube videos on high blood pressure found that one-third offered "misleading" information. Most often, that meant the video advocated supplements or other alternative therapies that haven't been scientifically proven to lower blood pressure.

"It's quite concerning," said lead researcher Dr. Nilay Kumar, who is scheduled to present the findings Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hypertension in New York City.

"The videos that were misleading seemed to get a lot more hits than the videos from authoritative sources," said Kumar, a physician with the Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts.

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High-Protein Diets May Increase Risk of Kidney Disease

highproteindietmancerealHigh-protein diets, such as the Dukan diet, are currently a popular alternative to the traditional calorie-counting forms of dieting. But scientists at the University of Granada in Spain have shown through tests in rats that a high-protein diet increases the risk of kidney stones and other renal diseases. 

Dr. Pierre Dukan's high-protein diet has received a boost in popularity in recent years, due to reports that the diet helped the Duchess of Cambridge get thin enough to fit into her wedding dress and allegedly restored the postpartum figure of Jennifer Lopez.

In Dukan's native France, approximately 2 million people are believed to follow the diet.

But the diet has been controversial. The British Dietary Association ranked the diet at number 1 in their annual rundown of diets to avoid in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

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19 Habits That Wreck Your Teeth

fathersonteethChewing on Ice

It’s natural and sugar free, so you might think ice is harmless. But munching on hard, frozen cubes can chip or even crack your teeth. And if your mindless chomping irritates the soft tissue inside a tooth, regular toothaches may follow. Hot foods and cold foods may trigger quick, sharp jabs of pain or a lingering toothache. Next time you get the urge for ice, chew some sugarless gum instead.

Playing Sports with No Mouth Guard

Whether you play football, hockey, or any other contact sport, don't get in the game without a mouth guard. This is a piece of molded plastic that protects the upper row of teeth. Without it, your teeth could get chipped or even knocked out when the action gets rough. Self-fitting mouth guards may be purchased at a store, or you can have one custom made by your dentist.

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9 Surprising Ways to Lower Your Diabetes Risk

type2diabetespreventionYou might not know that these small steps can produce big results

The most common form of diabetes, Type 2 (once called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes), affects 90 to 95 percent of the 26 million Americans with diabetes.

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We're In Serious Denial About Our Weight

obesityisnowdiseaseAlthough the obesity rate is increasing in the United States, Americans seem to be in denial about their own expanding waistlines.

More than half of adults (55 percent) said they don't think they are overweight and aren't making an effort to shed pounds, according to a new Gallup poll. In contrast, recent studies have shown that two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese.

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HIV/AIDS

hivaidsmanAlso called: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, HIV, Human immunodeficiency virus

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It kills or damages the body's immune system cells. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stage of infection with HIV.

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12 Heart Symptoms Never to Ignore

12symptomsHeart disease is the No. 1 killer of U.S. men and women, accounting for 40% of all U.S. deaths. That's more than all forms of cancer combined.

Why is heart disease so deadly? One reason is that many people are slow to seek help when symptoms arise. Yes, someone gripped by sudden chest pain probably knows to call 911. But heart symptoms aren't always intense or obvious, and they vary from person to person and according to gender.

Because it can be hard to make sense of heart symptoms, doctors warn against ignoring possible warning signs, waiting to see if they go away, or being quick to blame them on heartburn, muscle soreness, or other less serious, noncardiac causes. That's especially true for people over 65, as well as for people with heart risk factors, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, diabetes, or a family history of heart disease.

"The more risk factors you have, the higher the likelihood that a symptom means something is going on with your heart," says David Frid, MD, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic. "People often don't want to admit that they're old enough or sick enough to have heart trouble. Putting off treatment for other medical problems might not be so bad, but a serious heart problem can mean sudden death."

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The ABCs of High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

hypertensionHigh Blood Pressure Treatment

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is dangerous because it can lead to strokes, heart attacks, heart failure, or kidney disease. The goal of hypertension treatment is to lower high blood pressure and protect important organs, like the brain, heart, and kidneys from damage. Treatment for hypertension has been associated with reductions in stroke (reduced an average of 35%-40%), heart attack (20%-25%), and heart failure (more than 50%), according to research.

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Will I Have Chest Pain If I Have a Heart Attack?

heartattackNot always, our expert says. And that's why you should know all the potential symptoms of a heart attack.

Q: I'll know I'm having a heart attack because my chest and arm will hurt, right?

A: Not necessarily. While some heart attacks do feature classic symptoms like chest and arm pain, the idea that they all do is FALSE.

About 25% of men and 40% of women don't have chest pain during heart attacks, says Harmony Reynolds, MD, associate director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center and assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

With or without chest and arm pain, women may have "shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, sweating, palpitations, dizziness, loss of appetite, or pain in other areas such as the jaw, throat, neck, shoulders, or upper or middle back," Reynolds says.

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Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers, written as a ratio like this:
 

bloodpressureabSystolic

The top number, which is also the higher of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats (when the heart muscle contracts).
 
Diastolic

The bottom number, which is also the lower of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats (when the heart muscle is resting between beats and refilling with blood).

 

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The Warning Signs of Stroke

strokewarningsignsA stroke occurs about every 40 seconds. Each year, about 795,000 Americans have a stroke. Do you know the warning signs?

Sometimes symptoms of stroke develop gradually. But if you are having a stroke, you are more likely to have one or more sudden warning signs like these.

  • Numbness or weakness in your face, arm, or leg, especially on one side
  • Confusion or trouble understanding other people
  • Trouble speaking
  • Trouble seeing with one or both eyes
  • Trouble walking or staying balanced or coordinated
  • Dizziness
  • Severe headache that comes on for no known reason

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Heart Attack Symptoms

heartattacksymptomsSymptoms of a heart attack include:

  • Discomfort, pressure, heaviness, or pain in the chest, arm or below the breastbone
  • Discomfort radiating to the back, jaw, throat, or arm
  • Fullness, indigestion, or choking feeling (may feel like heartburn)
  • Sweating, nausea, vomiting, or dizziness
  • Extreme weakness, anxiety, or shortness of breath
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeats

 

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