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Health

The 5 Exercises You Should Do Everyday

5exercisesBalance and mobility training can benefit us at any age, but it becomes more important as you reach and pass the age of 50.

Maintaining joint range of motion allows you to move naturally and helps to combat the postural problems that cause neck, back, shoulder and hip pain.

Far from only preventing stumbles and falls, balance training is extremely important for everyone because it makes us better at every physical thing we do. Having a keen sense of proprioception (the sense of where your body is in space) makes all movement more efficient. When combined with fluid joints that allow for a full range of motion, this puts you at your functional best.

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The Benefits of Exercise Go Way Beyond the Muscles

exerciseisessentialEvery year, John Thyfault snaps the same photo, and it makes him a little sad.

Thyfault, PhD, is an associate professor at Kansas University Medical Center, where he studies the health effects of exercise. Each year, he travels to the American Diabetes Association’s annual scientific sessions. The meeting attracts roughly 18,000 people and is held in massive convention centers that span the distances of several football fields, their floors connected by long staircases and humming escalators.

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Do I Have Restless Legs Syndrome?

restlesslegsThe Question: How can I tell if I have restless legs syndrome?

The Answer: No matter how hard you may try, there are just some nights where the quality of your sleep is downright pitiful. But if tossing and turning feels more painful than frustrating, then you might be one of the more than 3 million people in the United States who suffer from the neurological condition restless legs syndrome (also known as Willis-Ekbom disease).

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12 Heart Symptoms Never to Ignore

12symptomsHeart disease is the No. 1 killer of U.S. men and women, accounting for 40% of all U.S. deaths. That's more than all forms of cancer combined.

Why is heart disease so deadly? One reason is that many people are slow to seek help when symptoms arise. Yes, someone gripped by sudden chest pain probably knows to call 911. But heart symptoms aren't always intense or obvious, and they vary from person to person and according to gender.

Because it can be hard to make sense of heart symptoms, doctors warn against ignoring possible warning signs, waiting to see if they go away, or being quick to blame them on heartburn, muscle soreness, or other less serious, noncardiac causes. That's especially true for people over 65, as well as for people with heart risk factors, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, diabetes, or a family history of heart disease.

"The more risk factors you have, the higher the likelihood that a symptom means something is going on with your heart," says David Frid, MD, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic. "People often don't want to admit that they're old enough or sick enough to have heart trouble. Putting off treatment for other medical problems might not be so bad, but a serious heart problem can mean sudden death."

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Health & Wellness Summit Thank You

 

BBBhealthsummit200Thank you to all of our sponsors, exhibitors and presenters whose presence made the Brain Brawn & Body Health & Wellness Summit presented by Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare a tremendous success. Without you the day couldn’t have been complete.

 

Thank you too to our gracious host, Journey House, who opened its doors to us and provided an environment perfectly fit for preparation, teaching and learning. Theirs is an outstanding facility that we hope more people from the community and the city at-large take greater advantage of.

Most of all, thank you to the people who came out in a show of support for their own health and wellness. It is critical that we take control of our own health and wellbeing, one man-one woman in their time, if we are going to have success closing the disparity gap. The system will only do so much.

At Brain Brawn & Body, it is our belief that through education and sharing of information that we will be healed from many of the ailments that we suffer. It is through gatherings like the Summit that we will be informed and motivated to continue to learn.

 

 

 

9 Surprising Ways to Lower Your Diabetes Risk

type2diabetespreventionYou might not know that these small steps can produce big results

The most common form of diabetes, Type 2 (once called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes), affects 90 to 95 percent of the 26 million Americans with diabetes.

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Diabetes: Keeping Up With Your Active Life

couplerunningPut Your Shoes by the Door

Take a minute to put a pair of slip-on shoes and socks near the door so you aren't tempted to go outside barefoot. Make sure your slippers or house shoes are in a handy location too, so you'll remember to wear them inside to avoid injury.
This is just one of many simple, quick tips that can be done in minutes to better manage your diabetes and prevent complications.

Do a Quick Body Scan

As you dry off from your shower each day, inspect your body head to toe. Look for dry, red, or sore spots that could become infected. Don't forget the places where moisture can hide and bacteria can grow. Check under your arms and breasts, and between your legs and toes. Pay special attention to your feet. Use a mirror to help you see all over and treat injuries quickly.

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Change Bad Habits Early, Save Your Heart Later

twomenonbikeschangelifestyleYoung adults who adopt healthier lifestyle can cut their heart disease risk, researchers say

Young adults who drop their bad health habits can reduce their risk of heart disease as they age, new research suggests.

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Cardiac Screening Test May Help Determine . . .

cardianscreeningaspirin. . . Who Should Take Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

For over 30 years, aspirin has been known to prevent heart attacks and strokes, but who exactly should take a daily aspirin remains unclear. New research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes shows that your coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, a measurement of plaque in the arteries that feed the heart, may help determine whether or not you are a good candidate for aspirin.

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Prostate Cancer in African Americans

health032513Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. While it isn’t known why African American men have higher rates of getting and dying from prostate cancer, CDC believes that what you know can help you.

African American men should know the facts about prostate cancer.

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CDC - Young African American Men Get Most HIV

HIV Hits 15 Times More African-American Women, 6 Times More African-American Men Than Whites

By Daniel J. DeNoon

HIVsmlHIV is striking African-Americans with "alarming" ferocity, according to a new CDC report. The CDC recently reported that the overall U.S. HIV epidemic was much worse than we'd thought. Now the CDC points to groups for whom the HIV epidemic is vastly worse:

  • Young (aged 13-29) black men who have sex with men get HIV more often than any other age/racial group.
  • African-American women are 15 times more likely to get HIV than are white women.
  • African-American men are six times more likely to get HIV than are white men.
  • Hispanic women are four times more likely to get HIV than are white non-Hispanic women.
  • Hispanic men are more than twice as likely to get HIV than are white non-Hispanic men.
  • Among Hispanics, men get 76% of new HIV infections.
  • African-Americans get nearly half of all new HIV infections in the U.S.
  • Men who have sex with men get more than half of all new HIV infections in the U.S.
  • Among white gay/bisexual men, those aged 30-39 and 40-49 get the most new HIV infections.

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Preventing High Blood Pressure

hypertensionstudyA recent study shows that hospitalization due to high blood pressure is more common among African Americans. Learn what you can do to reduce your risk of developing high blood pressure.

High Blood Pressure among African Americans

According to the 2010 US Census, approximately 36% of the population belongs to a racial or ethnic minority group.

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6 Supplements for Heart Health

hearthealthsupplementsCould supplements really boost your heart health? They might.

Research shows that some supplements -- in addition to lifestyle changes and medical treatment if you need it -- may help lower cholesterol, improve blood pressure, and reduce other risk factors for heart disease.

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9 Science-Backed Reasons To Go to Bed Early

needyoursleepShow of hands if you've ever stayed up way too late texting with friends, catching up on TV shows, or scrolling aimlessly through Pinterest or Reddit. Yep, plenty of us are guilty as charged -- and as a result, we end up feeling exhausted in the morning.

That most Americans are falling short on getting the recommended eight hours of sleep per night is nothing new.

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7 Exercises to Never Do After 50

exercisesnotforafter50Working out the same way in your 50s as you did in your 30s sets you up for a world of hurt. Changes in flexibility, muscular strength, bone density and recovery time make injuries more likely if you don’t adjust accordingly.

In fact, you may be better off skipping some exercises altogether.

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Women and Coronary Artery Disease

coronaryheartdis2014

 Why is it important for women to learn about coronary artery disease?

Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death for women throughout the world. More women die from heart disease than from cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Alzheimer's, and accidents combined.

But many women underestimate the threat coronary artery disease (CAD) poses to their health. And many women do not know what they can do to help prevent heart disease.

What is coronary artery disease?

Coronary artery disease is caused by the gradual buildup of plaque (made of fat, cholesterol and other substances) on the inside walls of the coronary arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart. Over time, the plaque deposits grow large enough to narrow the arteries' inside channels, decreasing blood flow to heart muscle. If the plaque becomes unstable and ruptures, a blood clot can form at the rupture site and block blood flow, resulting in a heart attack.

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Social Support May Be Key to Heart Attack Recovery

socialsupportrecoveryStudy found younger patients fared worse if they did not have family, friends to help afterwards

Young and middle-aged heart attack survivors are more likely to have poor health and low quality of life if they have fewer family and friends to support them in their recovery, a new study suggests.

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Strokes and the Toll They Take on Younger Adults

knowstrokesignsAbout 10% of the 800,000 strokes that happen in the U.S. each year strike adults younger than 45.

A stroke -- an event where blood flow to the brain is disrupted, either by a blood clot or bleeding -- can be devastating at any age. But when a younger adult has one, they're affected “in the prime of their life, in their most productive years,” says Jose Biller, MD. He's the chairman of the department of neurology at the Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University in Chicago.

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Heart Attack and Unstable Angina

angina14What is a heart attack?

A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. Without blood and the oxygen it carries, part of the heart starts to die. A heart attack doesn't have to be deadly. Quick treatment can restore blood flow to the heart and save your life.

Your doctor might call a heart attack a myocardial infarction, or MI. Your doctor might also use the term acute coronary syndrome for your heart attack or unstable angina.

What is angina, and why is unstable angina a concern?

Angina (say "ANN-juh-nuh" or "ann-JY-nuh") is a type of chest pain or discomfort that occurs when there is not enough blood flow to the heart. Angina can be dangerous. So it is important to pay attention to your symptoms, know what is typical for you, learn how to control it, and know when to call for help.

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Lung Cancer Prevention & Awareness

lungcancer14Did you know that more people die of lung cancer every year than from colon, breast and prostate cancers combined? Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer among both men and women, and cigarette smoking is the No. 1 cause of lung cancer. About 80% of lung cancer deaths result from smoking. 

African American men have the highest rates of lung cancer in the United States, and when they smoke around their family, everyone smokes! The smoke from cigarettes - called secondhand smoke - can cause lung cancer and other health problems in people who have never smoked, even kids.

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Blacks May Face Higher Risk of Diabetes-Linked Vision Loss

diabetesvisionlossDiabetic macular edema seems to strike some types of patients more frequently

Black Americans are at greater risk for diabetes-related vision loss than other racial groups battling the blood sugar disease, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which evaluates about 5,000 people each year. They found that blacks had the highest rates of a condition known as diabetic macular edema -- one of the leading causes of blindness in people with diabetes.

Diabetic macular edema occurs when fluid and protein builds up in a part of the retina. This causes retinal swelling and a resulting loss of vision, the researchers explained.

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High Blood Pressure in African-Americans

highbloodpressurecountriesHigh blood pressure, also known as hypertension, affects African-Americans in unique ways:

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HIV/AIDS

hivaidsmanAlso called: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, HIV, Human immunodeficiency virus

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It kills or damages the body's immune system cells. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the most advanced stage of infection with HIV.

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The ABCs of High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

hypertensionHigh Blood Pressure Treatment

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is dangerous because it can lead to strokes, heart attacks, heart failure, or kidney disease. The goal of hypertension treatment is to lower high blood pressure and protect important organs, like the brain, heart, and kidneys from damage. Treatment for hypertension has been associated with reductions in stroke (reduced an average of 35%-40%), heart attack (20%-25%), and heart failure (more than 50%), according to research.

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Will I Have Chest Pain If I Have a Heart Attack?

heartattackNot always, our expert says. And that's why you should know all the potential symptoms of a heart attack.

Q: I'll know I'm having a heart attack because my chest and arm will hurt, right?

A: Not necessarily. While some heart attacks do feature classic symptoms like chest and arm pain, the idea that they all do is FALSE.

About 25% of men and 40% of women don't have chest pain during heart attacks, says Harmony Reynolds, MD, associate director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center and assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.

With or without chest and arm pain, women may have "shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, sweating, palpitations, dizziness, loss of appetite, or pain in other areas such as the jaw, throat, neck, shoulders, or upper or middle back," Reynolds says.

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Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers, written as a ratio like this:
 

bloodpressureabSystolic

The top number, which is also the higher of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats (when the heart muscle contracts).
 
Diastolic

The bottom number, which is also the lower of the two numbers, measures the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats (when the heart muscle is resting between beats and refilling with blood).

 

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